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Features

  • When my oldest daughter was 4 or 5 we were riding with my mom and Alison blurted out, “Grandma, want to know a family secret?” I sat in the passenger seat frozen, not sure what my daughter was about to say.

  •  Wonder can lead to worship

        Nancy Kennedy

       

        If you don't count people or God, or maybe cake with buttercream icing, I think what I love most in life is wonder.

        I love the sense of surprise mixed with curiosity, of awe and bewilderment and delight -- all rolled into one emotion.

  • Grace has an eternal benefit

      If you can love someone you've only known one hour, then I love Berniece Robertson with all my heart.

    She called the newsroom early one Tuesday morning about a week ago from the hospital. She was dying, and it was her last day in our area. Her son had come from Missouri to take her to his farm to live out her remaining days.

  • What’s worse than a bloody, demented clown on a tricycle?  How about more bloody, demented clowns with chain saws – real chainsaws!

    Just ask any of the visitors who were brave enough to venture into the Hinton Haunted House last weekend.  Many of them can likely tell you.

    Visitors to the Hinton family’s house of spooky, gruesome frights will likely remember their trip for a long time.  

  • The venue change for Bushnell’s Fall Festival seemed to bring big success for many of the vendors and some added family-friendly bonuses for the community, according to event coordinator Ruby Mark.
    “There was lots of shade, lots of places for families to get together and picnic and lots of places for kids to play,” she said of the benefits.
    And while not all vendors had their best sales, some of them said they had more sales than ever at this year’s festival.

  • By Alex H. Kasprak

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Sure, the sun is great. It’s nice to not live in a frozen wasteland, after all. But the sun is pretty terrifying, too. It sends a dangerous stream of fast-moving electrons, protons, and other even smaller particles, called photons, toward Earth.

  • By Alex H. Kasprak

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Like Earth, the sun has an atmosphere with layers in it. The outermost layer is called the corona and it’s awild mess of activity. Scientists have long known about the corona. It is home to some spectacular shows—giant eruptions called Coronal Mass Ejections, loops, prominences and massive magnetic storms.

  • Sumter County Veterans Services announces the latest group of bricks has been installed in the Veterans’ Memorial park located on the west side of the Historic Courthouse in Bushnell. This park serves as a tribute to the men and women who courageously served our Country.

  • By Diane K. Fisher

    NASA Space Place

     

    How do astronauts on the International Space Station celebrate their birthdays? They could have a cake, if it were “glued” to the plate with frosting and the plate stuck to the table so it wouldn’t float off. But what about birthday candles? Would a candle even burn in space? Would it look any different from a candle flame on Earth?

  • The Science of Space Art

    By Diane K. Fisher

     

    You may have seen colorful, eye-popping space images in books or on NASA websites. There are beautiful spiral galaxies that shine in pinks and blues; glowing green and yellow clouds with great white-tipped columns; or the radiant leftovers of exploded stars that may look like an eye or a spider.

     

  • The Science of Space Art

    By Diane K. Fisher

     

    You may have seen colorful, eye-popping space images in books or on NASA websites. There are beautiful spiral galaxies that shine in pinks and blues; glowing green and yellow clouds with great white-tipped columns; or the radiant leftovers of exploded stars that may look like an eye or a spider.

     

  • When Earth and the moon were very young, they were much closer together. The moon was so close, it took up a huge part of Earth’s sky. When it hung overhead in the daytime, it cast such a shadow on the surface of Earth that in many places it would have been almost like night.

  •  

    Abundant life is just beyond your porch

     

    Fall weather is settling in, and many animals have begun or will soon start foraging for winter. But it is still quite warm in the Sunshine State, and wildlife is frisky and abundant, especially in your backyard.

    Take a walk outside. Look in bushes, shrubs, grass, on flowers, in and under potted plants and on the walls of your house. And, don’t forget to look up. Birds are perched in trees and soaring in the sky.

    How many critters can you find?

  • Linda Graves

  • By Linda Graves

  • After returning from a trip out of town, I sat down to read the Sumter County Times and get caught up on the two weeks of news I missed. I was surprised and saddened to read of the passing of Ms. Jemison, a friend who shared her love of animals with me,
    I met Mrs. Jemison through my Critter Chatter column. She was an avid reader of the column, and would call me or stop by my place of business to chat about many animal issues that concerned her.

  • By Linda Graves

  • By Linda Graves

  • Dry-docked, a large saltwater craft sits in the front yard of Richmond Kennedy’s Lake Panasoffkee home, lending a hint to his interests.
    Inside the house, a wall lined with bookcases is filled with trophies and a collection of aging black and white photographs that give a visual history of his career in speed boat racing.
    Former owner of two companies, Kennedy Craft, Inc. and Panacraft, Inc., Kennedy is a winning boat designer and speed racer. Now 80, he’s still fishing, still quick with a joke and unassuming about what he’s achieved.

  • By Linda Graves